A Century of Service, 1921-2021 Centennial Celebration Southern California Yachting Association

Alamitos Bay Yacht Club and burgee

This yacht club history is reproduced from the SCYA 2017 Race Calendar & Yacht Club Directory

The year 2017 marks the 91st year of growth for the Alamitos Bay Yacht Club. The club was founded on May 30; 1926, when fourteen charter members met upstairs in Holmer’s Boat Shop Avenue and Bayshore Walk.

Like many yacht clubs, Alamitos Bay has had its ups and downs. It was incorporated in 1927 and built its first facilities, with the club building pier and floats in 1928. These quarters were designed and built entirely by its members and served well until 1940, when the lease expired; due to the inability to secure new land, the building was sold and moved.

Alamitos Bay Yacht Club Leeway

During the next eight years two new clubhouse were built, one of which was on a floating barge, and both of these were subsequently destroyed by the elements. In 1948 the present clubhouse was acquired and moved to its present location. The development and construction work again was done by the members. Work parties have always been successful, and the present clubhouse represents many hours of labor by the membership.

Not unlike the facilities, the membership has had its ups and downs, too. In 1926, fourteen members established the Alamitos Bay Yacht Club. In 1928 and 1929 it boasted nearly 200 members, but in 1934 ten old-timers were all that kept it going. After the depression, the membership gradually built up again, to receive a setback during World War II. Strong leadership since the war, and many activities, have increased its membership children sail in the same or different classes in their own boats, and not at all unusual for a family to be represented in three or four classes in the same regatta.

Junior activities and training programs have so long had a prominent place in Alamitos Bay Yacht Club children sail in the same or different classes in their own boats, and not at all unusual for a family to be represented in three or four classes in the same regatta.

Junior activities and training programs have so long had a prominent place in Alamitos Bay Yacht Club activities that they are almost taken for granted. Many of the West’s best racing skippers got their training on Alamitos Bay, and more are being developed each year.

In keeping with the “Family Yacht Club” tradition, Alamitos Bay is one of the few clubs that have monthly general membership meetings, which are attended by young and old alike. Business meetings are short, and interesting entertainment in the form of sailing or educational pictures, as well as rule discussions, is customary, followed by refreshments and “shooting the breeze” which all yachtsmen enjoy.

When first established, Alamitos Bay Yacht Club sponsored handicap and restricted class yacht racing, although some of the members had already designed and built four or five of what was to become the International Skimmer Class. Handicap racing was soon discontinued when One-Design Class racing was found to be much more competitive and more fun, and such classes as the Skimmer, Rainbow, PDQ, Sabot, National One-Design, Snipe and International 14 have gained much popularity over a period of years.

Alamitos Bay members have always been great travelers, and one will always find the club well represented at all regattas whether they are in Southern California, in the east, Great Lakes, or Gulf.

In 1954 the bridge which crossed the entrance to the bay was removed, the jetties at the entrance were extended, and the bay dredged so that all of it is navigable. In addition, the first of six marina basins was completed in October 1956, and in early 1957 work began on the balance of the marina project In the development of this project, a site was provided for the Alamitos Bay Yacht Club, which made it possible to have one of the outstanding facilities in Southern California, not only for small boats, but for large boats as well.

The history below is from THE HISTORY OF YACHTING IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
Published in 1964
By Cass & Johansing Insurance Brokers
Read more about this >>>


The year 1957 marks the 31st year of growth for the Alamitos Bay Yacht Club. The club was founded on May 30, 1926, when fourteen charter members met upstairs in Hol­mer’s Boat Shop at Pier Avenue and Bayshore Walk.

Like many yacht clubs, Alamitos Bay has had its ups and downs. It was incorporated in 1927 and built its first facilities, with the club building, pier and floats in 1928. These quarters were designed and built entirely by its members and served well until 1940, when the lease expired; due to the inability to secure new land, the building was sold and moved.

ABYCDuring the next eight years two new clubhouses were built, one of which was on a floating barge, and both of these were subsequently destroyed by the elements. In 1948 the present clubhouse was acquired and moved to its present location. The development and construction work again was done by the members. Work parties have always been successful, and the present clubhouse represents many hours of labor by the membership.

Not unlike the facilities, the membership has had its ups and downs, too. In 1926, fourteen members established the Ala­mitos Bay Yacht Club. In 1928 and t929 it boasted nearly 200 members, but in 1934, ten old-timers were all that kept it going.  After the depression, the membership gradually built  up again, to receive a setback during World War II. Strong leadership since the war, and many activities, have increased its membership to approximately 300 at the present time (1967).

Alamitos Bay has always been known as a “Family Yacht Club.” Its activities have been designed and directed with he family in mind. H is common for Mother and Dad to sail one class of boat while the children sail in the same or different classes in their own boats, and not at all unusual for a family to be represented in three or four classes in the same regatta.

Junior activities and training programs have so long had a prominent place in Alamitos Bay Yacht Club activities that they are almost taken for granted. Many of the West’s best racing skippers got their training on Alamitos Bay, and more are being developed each year.

In keeping with the “Family Yacht Club” tradition, Ala­mitos Bay is one of the few clubs that have monthly general membership meetings, which are attended by young and old alike. Business’ meetings are short, and interesting entertain­ment in the form of sailing or educational pictures, as well as rule discussions, is customary, followed by refreshments and “shooting the breeze” which all yachtsmen enjoy.

When first established, Alamitos Bay Yacht Club sponsored handicap and restricted class yacht racing, although some of the members had already designed and built four or five of what was to become the International ‘Skimmer Class. Handicap racing was soon discontinued when One Design Class racing was found to be much more competitive and more fun, and such classes as the Skimmer, Rainbow, PDQ, Sabot, National One-Design, Snipe and International 14 have gained much popularity over a period of years.
Alamitos Bay members have always been great travelers, and one will always find the club well represented at all regattas whether they are in Southern California, in the east, Great Lakes, or Gulf.

At present, Alamitos Bay Yacht Club is entering a new period of growth. In 1954 the bridge which crossed the en­trance to the bay was removed, the jetties at the entrance were extended, and the bay dredged so that all of it is navig­able. In addition, the first of six marina basins was com­pleted in October 1956, and in early 1957 work will begin on the balance of the marina project. In the development of this project, a site will be provided for the Alamitos Bay Yacht Club, which will make it possible to have one of the outstanding facilities in Southern California not only for small boats, but for large boats as well.

The leadership of Alamitos Bay Yacht Club is well advanced in its planning for the new location, and. well along the way toward financing the move. The most difficult task ahead will be to progress and expand, and yet retain the friendliness and wonderful association that is to be found in a “Family Yacht Club.”